Kingdom Business

Posts about operating business in partnership with the Holy Spirit, business as mission, living intentionally.

That’s Interesting (and Important)

Embed from Getty Images

We’re all going somewhere. We don’t always think about where we’re heading or what our final destination is, but we’re all heading somewhere.

In a conversation with a friend, we started talking about how the world works.  We looked around and saw lots of interesting, fun things that ended nowhere good. That’s part of the enemies plan: to entertain us out of and away from anything of lasting value. The Bible says lasting fruit comes from connection with Him. At the same time, we know that people who desperately need Jesus (all of us 🙂 aren’t aware of it. We’re constantly looking for other things and misplacing our ultimate desire for God as a desire for _______ (you can fill in the blank).

So, we devised a plan, to help people go from “interesting” to “important.” We were doing this in Chinese, so I want to give a shout out to the fun Chinese phrase we came up with: 從有趣到有意義. We decided that many times people aren’t really interested in what’s important. They settle for what’s entertaining, or what’s urgent, or what’s on their Facebook feed. We too easily settle. But what if there were things that were meaningful but started with something interesting. I see examples of this in things like Aroma’s weekly event, Coffee Talk, where students “interested” in learning English begin to discuss meaningful topics. The challenge, however, is in doing both sides with excellence. Some people want to focus all their energy on the meaningful side and end up with something that’s not interesting at all. Others like fun, but have nothing meaningful on which to focus.

I dream of a day when people with meaningful work to be done can see an increasing number of people investing in their work creating pathways from “interesting” to “important” for society. I believe it will take a number of things:

  • We need understand the meaning of important. It’s not always the most urgent. It’s not always what’s in front of us.
  • We need to stop shooting charities in the foot. Read Uncharitable or watch the author’s TedTalk for more on this matter.
  • We need to free ourselves to think creatively about how to approach the important issues.
  • We need funding models that allow interesting and important to co-exist.

Here’s to interesting and important together towards a better future!



Embed from Getty Images

A while back I was challenged to think about the way I dealt with culture. I heard the challenge described in these two aspects that are to be held in tension: high context and low context. I’m not going to go in depth about how these cultures function. For that, I recommend this blog.

But one thing that did stick out was how I need to continue growing and adapting. I come from what is generally considered a low-context culture (the United States), but have been living in a high context culture (Taiwan) for nearly a decade. I’ve seen myself change in many ways over the last few years. For example, I sometimes avoid directness more than I did in college. I often find myself expecting people to read my body language and pick up on what I want, rather than telling them explicitly. In some ways, this may be good. Perhaps, I’m naturally finding ways to connect with Taiwanese.

While this may be beneficial (or potentially harmful depending on how you look at it), I want a Kingdom Culture more than I want to belong to any particular other culture. I appreciate the example we have in Jesus. He lived an “incarnational-hopeful culture,” in which he could meet us at our level and experience life with us, while preventing himself from diverging off the path of what He knew was right. Ultimately, He was able to honor people (John 4, woman at the well) regardless of culture, but also call people out when necessary (basically every time He talks to Pharisees, see John 8:44 if you need proof).

My prayer is that each of us would learn to discern the way Jesus did: connected and relevant in the cultural context while inviting into the glory of Heaven.

My Father’s Business (testimony)

Embed from Getty Images

There’s a story of young Jesus not keeping up with his parents on a journey. When questioned about why He wasn’t where He should have been, He responded with this: “Why did you seek Me? Did you not know that I must be about My Father’s business” (Luke 2:49)? Jesus committed His whole life to His Father’s business. He said, “I only do what I see the Father doing” (John 5:19). So what kinds of things did He do? He made a title sentence for “what the Father does,” when he read from the scroll of Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed, 19 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19).” He also showed us how to pursue the same thing when he taught us how to pray: “Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil” (Matthew 6:9-13). Near the end of His time on earth, he put us to the same task when He commissioned us in Matthew 28:18-19 beginning with the words “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” But what does that actually look like today. I submit that it looks like hosting God’s Presence in your life. It means that you are all about what god would have for you personally, for your community, and for the unique life on mission to which He’s called you. Here’s one example of someone pursuing God’s Presence in their lives and seeing God’s breakthrough happen continually.

On Sunday after our church service, someone came up to me and said, “Can I talk to you for a couple minutes?” I politely obliged and she started sharing. She recalled,

I’m usually a pretty negative person. I get all these negative thoughts in my head and it takes days to get them out. A week ago during our worship time, I felt something click, and all the sudden, I didn’t experience those thoughts. In fact, I went an entire week without having any negative thoughts. That’s unheard of for me. But wait, there’s more. I’ve been working through dealing with shame in my life. I had felt that I couldn’t put my finger on what was causing the same. All the sudden, the Tuesday after that church service, I started crying on the MRT. I realized that God was clearly revealing to me what shame I could deal with. He showed me how He has been there the whole time and wants to heal those areas. But wait, there’s more. I know that God wants me to initiate forgiveness and honor in my family, so I reinitiated contact with some family members I hadn’t been in touch with. God has already started doing things through those conversations.

She shared a couple more things I’m choosing not to say, but I can recount that it was amazing. I sensed God’s pleasure and joy all over her freedom and new life that’s been restored in her. The theme became “But wait, there’s more.” In fact, after that short conversation, she proceeded to send me more text messages. I’ll copy paste a bunch of texts and let you see it yourself.

There’s actually one more thing that happened in Sunday during the Christmas Eve service that I didn’t really share with you. Since my parents passed away I’ve always struggled with “Christmas depression” … usually it starts the first or second week of December and continues until the first week of January. This year it has been different. For one it only started to happen the week before Christmas, and also it wasn’t as intense. Anyway, Christmas Eve was a hard day for me. And when I showed up at Aroma I thought I was ok, but then I started tearing up as worship started. Then I felt Jesus asking, why are you holding onto this thing? Don’t you think that I’m strong enough to take it? Honestly, the idea had never occurred to me. I’ve always shared the burden with Him, but it never occurred to me that He wanted to release me from the burden of it. (Haha) So I did. And right away the sadness was replaced with this peace. Ah, Jesus is good indeed! And since Sunday the usually sadness hasn’t returned, only moments. And when those moments come, I give them to Jesus, and the sadness disappears. Umm.. and there’s more :). Remember that time we talked about family and I mentioned how broken things were. And you responded with something like .. not impossible. To which I responded with supreme doubt. Well, perhaps not so impossible (haha). Today my middle brother (whose father in law I asked you to pray for) messaged me saying my eldest brother had done something. Turns out he gave he 2 gift cards, $25 for my niece and a $50 one for Red Lobster for my brother and his wife. My brother said he was so surprised all he could say was thank you. This is the first time in 17 years that his eldest brother has given him a Christmas gift! I know this might just be a one-time thing, but it happened and my heart is so full! Just thinking about it makes me tear up. Jesus, seriously?? Even this you want to do?!? It’s like He’s taking care of business one thing at a time. Like He was just waiting for me to be brave so that He could begin to heal the brokenness. When I was on the mrt today the verse about the mustard seed and faith came to mind (Matthew 17:20).

Sometimes, we don’t keep up. Sometimes, we seem a bit off and a bit out of place. But God doesn’t see it that way. He sees us “about His business.” And that’s it. That’s precisely why we exist: to be about our Father’s business. What does He do? He builds highways in deserts. He sings songs over people. He speaks life. He raises the dead. He opens blind eyes. He sets people free from guilt, fear and shame. He’s so good! And I’m sure there’s going to be more. In fact, I’m sure that you’re going to get something out of this, too. What’s your struggle? What’s the impossible thing in your life? Jesus has given you the keys to the Kingdom (Matthew 16:19). He’s given you a mustard seed of faith (Luke 17:6). What burden does He want to remove? What situation does He want to radically change? Where will He put his resources. Will the Son of Man find faith on the earth (Luke 18:8)? I believe He will. Christ is in you, that’s the Hope of Glory (Colossians 1:27).

5Q: Answers to a Decade (or more) of My Organizational Questions

disclosure statement: I was given a copy of this book, 5Q, by Alan Hirsch to give an honest review of it.

It’s 5:30 in the morning and I can’t put this thing down. I’ve planted a church and started a business in Taiwan, a culture which has traditionally been more resistant to the gospel’s work, with around 3% of 23,000,000 people professing faith in Christ. There have been successes in our ministry. Just a few days ago we were recounting what God’s done and noted that 34 people have been baptized since 2012.  and I’ll be one of the first to admit I often feel I have no idea what I’m doing. The reason I couldn’t put this book down is because Hirsch is putting into words feelings I’ve had for nearly a decade (which is a lifetime for a millennial). The premise of Hirsch’s latest work is that Jesus Christ has already given us a blueprint for what leadership, mission, evangelism, care and teaching should look like and how it’s done. He’s calling us to allow the latent seeds of the fivefold gifts, also referred to as APEST or 5Q, Christ gave the church to begin to grow again. APEST, or apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers, are five different gifts or ministries that Christ placed in the church as a result of his ascension (Ephesians 4:1-16). He writes, “In it’s simplest form, 5Q is the synergy of a holistic recombination of the apostolic, prophetic, evangelistic, shepherding and teaching (APEST) capacities referred to in Ephesians.” These gifts were given so that we could minister as the body of Christ and ultimately attain to the fullness of Christ. But Hirsch argues the archetypal evidence of APEST predates the establishment of the church and is actually part of the prevenient grace that God established when He created the world. Essentially, understanding and utilizing the fivefold is THE KEY to healthy, thriving organizations across the board whether in business, church or elsewhere.

By understanding 5Q, we are able to assess the health and capacity of our organizations, churches and businesses included. Hirsch traces biblical foundations, primordial forms and archetypes and ultimately the life of Jesus as the architect and builder of 5Q. Jesus shows us that the patterns of 5Q can be used to understand and assess His ministry as well as his commandments to the church. He outlines the fivefold functionality of the church and society at large. In utilizing 5Q, we have a clear trajectory for how to impart, empower and deploy the greatest move of God the world has ever seen! Hirsch gives numerous accounts of how utilizing 5Q in our organizations will invariably lead to transformation on all levels of society.

Here are some of my favorite quotes:

  1. It is not coincidental that this breakthrough has come at a time in my life when my spiritual life has never been better–I am experiencing God in a whole new dimension. I find myself spending whole days in prayer and meditation. My prayer life is rich to the point of overflow. In a real way, I believe that 5Q has played a significant role in this sense of overflow. 5Q feels both personal to me, but I also feel its universal significance.
  2. If you want transformational gospel movement–really want it–then you are going to have to unlearn some very ancient churchly habits and be willing to relearn some new–and yet paradoxically more ancient–more authentically biblical ones. You’re a leader; I speak to you as a leader responsible for your generation.
  3. In fact, I hope to show, fivefold-thinking (5Q) reaches into our deepest instincts for ministry by reconnecting the ministry of Christ with the Body of Christ.
  4. Jesus “gave” APEST to the church, distributing it among all the people as he sees fit. It is vital that you, the reader, feel the weight of the grammar that Paul uses to talk about the constitutional givenness of the APEST ministries to the church. The verb form used for “given” (Gk. edothe, the aorist indicative form of didomi) is an aorist indicative, a very resolute verb form perfectly suited for use in constitutions. This is because aorists reflect actions that took place in the past and as such they are once-and-for-all-time events. The effects of the past event are still felt in the present. They are historic in a similar way that the signing of the Declaration of Independence was historic—it will impact America’s self-understanding for all time…Jesus is actually present in the church, and by which he extends his own ministry through us.
  5. Because they operate within a system, each individual APEST function enriches, counterbalances, and “corrects” the particular bias of each of the others.
  6. The good news is that all five functions/callings are like seeds latent in the system. They are already there by virtue of the defining Word of God. This is a liberating idea—all the potential for a tree is actually already in the seed; we don’t need to mess much with that. What we need to do is simply focus on the environment that will allow the seed to flourish.
  7. [M]issional movements are essentially a recovery of the apostolic impulse; prayer and justice movements are manifestations of the prophetic impulse; revivals are an aspect of evangelistic; community and charismatic renewal is a recovery of the pastoral ministry; and theological renewals are largely related to a rediscovery of some lost motif in Scripture.
  8. It is this relationship between high internal resonance and explicit social patterning that this chapter seeks to address. The idea here will be to try to connect the resonance that you should feel in regards to APEST functions and callings with the community in which you are called to express faith.
  9. Giving the answer is always easier than teaching the process…I often say to leaders that we can change our structures in four to eight months, but it takes four to eight years to change our culture.
  10. We see the five marks of the church defined by APEST as follows: missional impact (A), covenant faithfulness (P), gospel proclamation (E), reconciled community (S), deep wisdom (T).

Near the end of the book, Hirsch quotes Peter Berger who notes, “Ideas do not succeed in history by virtue of their truth but by virtue of their relationship to specific social processes,” and as such we are called not only to revel in fun ideas, but to actually begin applying them. Thus, my personal plan to 5Q implementation: do it. In all seriousness, I am indebted to Hirsch and the rest of his team for packaging a biblical, theological treatise on 5Q. For me and my team, we typically think about church in three terms: personal growth, community growth, and missional growth. These are the outworking of pondering Jesus’ Great Commandment (love God, love others) and Great Commission (make disciples in the world). If we are affect the cultural fabric of society, speak truth to power and life to dry bones, plant the seeds of the good news and win souls for Christ, gather God’s sons and daughters, and ensure God’s Truth is passed on correctly, we are in desperate need of 5Q thinking, systems and action. APEST provides an excellent framework, aspects of which we are already integrating. We speak cultural transformation (A), share the good news regularly (E), and teach truth (T), but I have seen how we can and must grow in all areas of APEST and I’m confident with teaching and tools outlined in this book, we are already on the right path.

I would encourage you to pick up a copy of this book and check out additional resources online. The diagrams offered are more than worth the price of admission. Hirsch will offer insights into the fivefold ministry that will shape your ongoing business and ministry endeavors.

One Powerful Leadership Tool You Can Implement Today

Embed from Getty Images

In this generation we are looking for authentic, real engagement and connection. We are hungry for real relationships, because we have seen fake and know that it doesn’t deliver. Do you want to help facilitate life transformation in the lives of people around you? Are you interested in keeping people engaged in vision or on track with a mission? Are you hoping to connect with someone in particular? If your hope is to lead, or facilitate influence, then you’ve got to have this tool.

I am interested in seeing your success. I want you to make a difference in the world. I believe that your leadership can change your environment and improve the world we’re living in today. Our leadership makes a legacy. But if we can’t engage people or keep them connected, how are we going to facilitate change? You have got to have this one tool in your arsenal. Please understand that your ability to implement this tool will become a catalyst for the change you know you’re called to bring about.

I’ve seen teams fall apart. I’ve also seen teams overcome deficiencies and all odds going on to meet deadlines, accomplish goals, and achieve vision. What was the difference? They engaged in this tool: vulnerability. You see, we want authenticity because we live in an inauthentic world, and in order to achieve that, we have to be willing to share where we are. Two generations ago, we needed our leaders to be perfect. Today, we’re well aware that no one is perfect.

You see, there was one perfect person: Jesus. And he engaged in perfect vulnerability that led to deeper, more authentic relationships with those around him. He showed vulnerability when he cried at Lazarus’ funeral (John 11:35), when he asked the disciples for help praying (Matthew 26:40), and when he cried out to Father on the cross (Matthew 27:46).

In these moments, Jesus modeled for us a willingness to be vulnerable with where He was at, but also remain hopeful about what was going to happen. This is the perfect mix of weakness and strength. We call it “humility.” We don’t need the shows of perfection; we need the space to be humbly honest about the desperate situation we’re in so that we can grow in expectation that our perfect Father would respond with a resurrection. It’s like Paul said, “His power is made perfect in weakness” (1 Corinthians 12:9).

Too often, however, we attempt to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps so that we can feign a semblance of strength in front of our peers and teammates. What we see in Jesus, however, is a willingness to share his weaknesses and struggles with the team. At the same time, He could stay perfectly in tune with Truth that allowed him to draw the hope and expectation of Heaven into the hopeless situation He faced.

What’s your desperate situation and how can you be both vulnerable and strong? I believe by sharing the honest struggle you’re having and asking God and your teammates to enter into it, you’ll see a major breakthrough.

Covenant Sermon Series: Our Covenant with God

We’ve recently had a new sermon series on Covenant Relationships. We are spending a month learning about how the ideas behind “covenant” help us understand our relationship with God, with each other and with the world. To help provide more background, and because it’s well-done, we showed this video on Covenant made by Bible Project. Here are excerpts from the sermon on Our Covenant with God.

  1. Sermon in a Sentence: God invites you to a covenant in which He is faithful and you are washed, protected, and brought into the family as you submit.
  2. I recently watched a group of 10 year olds playing basketball. Mercy wasn’t under the covenant. It’s poetic irony. Mercy brings us under the covenant, but she wasn’t responding to her name. She wanted to win desperately, but wasn’t willing to follow her coach’s leading. Instead, she kept throwing up air balls. 
  3. God invites you to a covenant. Every covenant has an introduction, historical background, stipulations, and blessings and curses depending on whether both parties keep the covenant. 
  4. In which He is faithful.  God is a faithful partner even when we are not. Let’s review the four covenants we mentioned last week. Noah. I’ll keep the world a safe place. I’ll never destroy it again. Abraham. I’ll bless you so you can be a blessing. Moses. I’ll lead you to the promised land as you follow my ways. David. I’ll be a faithful king and bless you among the nations. In each one of these circumstances, the people were unfaithful, but God remained faithful and true to His Word and Promise. 
  5. And You are washed, protected, and brought into the family. In Ephesians 5:25-32 we read all the things Jesus has done for us. He gave himself for us. He washed and cleansed us. He presented us without spot. He wants the best for us. He nourishes us.
  6. As you submit. This is our half of the covenant. The word mentioned in Ephesians 5:22, 23, and 32 is a combination of a preposition meaning “under” and a verb meaning “plan.” God wants to see us “under the plan.” It’s controversial. But it’s the way God made it. He is looking to be a husband to us. And in turn his expectation is that we would be a wife “subjected to” him. Are you willing to be “subjected to him?” What would it look like in your Finances? In your physical health? Can you imagine if submitted to God’s plan for your business?
  7. Do you ever remember getting a great present or kind gift. Perhaps, you didn’t know how to use it. you had to follow the manual. The user manual wants you to get the best out of the equipment. The world tells us we understand enough to figure it out. How’s that been working for you?
  8. God has ordained, appointed, determined, set an abundant life for you and all you need to do is put yourself in submission to it. Memorize James 4:7: Submit yourselves, then, to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. Proclaim the covenant you’re under. See if God doesn’t come to the rescue. We must be willing to submit ourselves to the covenant or we will not receive its benefits. God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.

You can watch this sermon and more via our Facebook Live Feed.